Craftmanship page 1

From Clay to the famous Delft Pottery

Craftmanship


Our entirely hand painted decorations always have a white background. That's why we use a white baking clay. This clay is imported from Germany, the Westerwald and from England, Cornwall as the Dutch clay doesn't burn white but red and yellow.

 
Craftmanship

Delftware is made with moulds. First the clay is mixed with water. This liquid clay is poured into moulds. The moulds are made out of plaster of Paris which is a very porous material and it absorbs the water out of the clay. It makes that the clay dries.

 
Craftmanship

After about half an hour the clay wall is already 4 mm thick but in the middle it's still liquid. At that moment the moulds are turned upside down to pour out this liquid centre. That's how an item is made hollow. After about four hours the clay is dry enough to open the moulds and the clay item can be taken out of the mould.

 
Craftmanship

The edges are trimmed with a knife and the article is smoothed with a wet sponge. The articles are dried for three days before they are put into an electric heated kiln. The firing takes 8 hours and the temperature reaches 1040 degrees Centigrade (which is about 1900 degrees Fahrenheit). The cooling down takes about 24 hours. During the firing, the clay changes into stone which is called biscuit.